Gain Rapid Success in Public Speaking

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Norma Hollis

Enough is enough already!

I’ve heard it too many times over the last several months, “It’s too hard to gain
success as a speaker in this market!”

Nonsense!

All you need is a message, a way to present it and the desire to touch the lives of others.

Does this sound like you?

  • You want to make a difference in the world
  • You have a message you want to share
  • You want others to find life easier than how it has been for you
  • You want to promote your business through speaking
  • You want speaking to be a new source of income

There are hundreds of reasons to want to speak. But learning how to do it well, without spending a
lot of money is another story.

Now there is a basic system that can help you gain the information you need to be successful in a
short period.

Whether you are just interested in strengthening your message and presentation skills or want to be a
highly paid motivational speaker, Norma’s online training process is the place to start.

Click here to learn more. http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?af=1670006  

Norma’s clients say she shaves years off their learning curve as a speaker. Gain the knowledge you need,
get coached and step into your speaking role with great confidence. Norma will guide you through the
process whether you are brand new or have been speaking for years. You will not be disappointed.

Click here to get started. http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?af=1670006   

You will be happy that you did.

Sincerely,

Camille

Make a Difference in the World as a Speaker

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Dear Friend,

Are you a new or emerging speaker who wants to make a difference in the world? I want to introduce you to an associate of mine who helps speakers use their voice to make a difference while also earning income as a professional speaker.

Norma Hollis

Her name is Norma Hollis and she has spent over 20 years in the professional speaking industry as owner of a
speaker bureau, event producer, coach, author and speaker. She has created a membership program to help new
and emerging speakers gain rapid success in the speaking industry. If you want to use your voice to make a difference
in the world, Norma is the person to assist you.

Her program launches Thursday, January 19. I will be sending you an email tomorrow so you can find out more
and sign up for this great program.  In the meantime, you can add your name to her list and she will communicate
with you on Thursday.

Click this link to add your name to her list  http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?af=1670006 

Norma is all about authenticity and helping speakers find, live and share their authentic voice. She has developed
the highly impactful R.A.P.I.D.S. Speaking System that helps speakers gain rapid success. She knows her stuff and
freely shares it. Norma has helped hundreds of speakers gain success. She can help you too.

Get on her list here: http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?af=1670006 

You will be happy that you did.

Sincerely,

Camille 

The 39th annual Kennedy Center Honors airs Tuesday, Dec. 27th – Video of the reception speech with photos

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Hello Everyone!

Stephen Colbert will return to host the 39th annual Kennedy Center Honors event which is one of the highlights of the Washington social calendar, and will be broadcast on the CBS Network on Dec. 27, 2016 at 9pm EST

The longest, loudest standing ovation of the Kennedy Center Honors gala went to the man attending his eighth and most likely his last honors presentation: President Barack Obama.

President Obama humorously speaks at the reception for Kennedy Center Honorees in the video below..

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President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive at the for the Kennedy Center Honoree Reception at the White House_Dec. 4, 2016
The event paid tribute to 2016’s honorees, including (seated left) actor Al Pacino,  
gospel and blues singer Mavis Staples, pianist Martha Argerich. singer-songwriter
 James Taylor and (standing left) rock legends Joe Walsh, Don Henley, and
Timothy Schmit of the Eagles 
President Obama introduces the 2016 Kennedy Center Honorees at the White House reception_December 4, 2014
President Obama with First Lady Michelle Obama enjoying the
2016  Kennedy Center Honors_December 4, 2016 
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Fashionistas:  
First Lady Michelle Obama is stunning in an off-the-shoulder Gucci holiday dress. With forest green and rose gold embellishments. 
NCM Blog
December 27 2016
Happy New Year!
Camille

Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa converges for an Exciting Holiday Season

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שלום לכולם!

Hello Everyone!
Beautiful Vintage Hanukkah Menorah
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President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle and Rabbi Rachel Isaacs join Chemi Peres and Mika Almog for the menorah lighting during Hanukkah in the East Room of the White House, Dec. 14, 2016
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Hanukkah
Saturday, December 24, 2016 – Sunday, January 1, 2017

Hanukkah (/ˈhɑːnəkə/ hah-nə-kə; Hebrew: חֲנֻכָּה‎ khanuká, Tiberian: khanuká, usually spelled חנוכה, pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, [ˈχanukə] or [ˈχanikə] in Yiddish; a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah or Ḥanukah) is a Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt against the Seleucid Empire.

Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar. It is also known as the Festival of Lights and the Feast of Dedication.

The festival is observed by the kindling of the lights of a unique candelabrum, the nine-branched menorah (also called a Chanukiah/Hanukiah), one additional light on each night of the holiday, progressing to eight on the final night. The typical menorah consists of eight branches with an additional visually distinct branch. The extra light, with which the others are lit, is called a shamash (Hebrew: שמש‎‎, “attendant”) and is given a distinct location, usually above or below the rest.

Other Hanukkah festivities include playing dreidel and eating oil-based foods such as doughnuts and latkes. Since the 1970s, the worldwide Chabad Hasidic movement has initiated public menorah lightings in open public places in many countries.

 
Tuesday, December 27, 2016 – 3pm – 8pm
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Christmas Eve
Saturday, December 24, 2016

Christmas tree with presents hanging on the tree
Significance Day or evening preceding the traditional birthday of Jesus
Observances Gift shopping, gift giving, goodwill greetings, Midnight Mass, other church services, meals, preparations for the arrival of Christmas gift-bringers, preparing for Christmas
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Christmas Tree fashioned into a festive dress
Christmas Day
Sunday, December 25, 2016
Christmas Day is a holiday in many, but not all, countries. Many homes have Christmas trees and other decorations in the weeks leading to Christmas Day. Some workplaces hold Christmas parties prior to December 25. Festive activities include exchanging presents, singing Christmas songs, going to parties.

It’s a special time when children get presents from family, friends and Santa Claus, or Father Christmas. Christmas cards are also given or sent out prior to Christmas Day.

For some, Christmas is an exclusive family affair, while others invite friends to a Christmas buffet or pot luck meal. Churches have special services and may include a crèche or miniature Nativity scene.

Opens in Theatres on Christmas Day, December 25th
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‘Fences’ film adaptation of August Wilson’s play staring 
Denzel Washington and Viola Davis
Kwanzaa means “First Fruits of Harvest”
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Kwanzaa
Monday, December 26, 2016 – Sunday, January 1, 2017
Kwanzaa (/ˈkwɑːn.zə/) is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles (Nguzo Saba). It was created by Maulana Karenga and was first celebrated in 1966–67.
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In their Guide to Whole Health series, Oprah and Deepak offer a unique blend of meditation and activities to help support facets of daily life that many people find difficult.
NCM Blog
December 23, 2016
Happy Holidays!
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Camille

The Choice 2016 (full film) | Frontline PBS Special – Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

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Hello Everyone!

This excellent PBS special of the two presidential candidates aired September 27, 2016; the day after the first general election debate between Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Real Estate Businessman Donald Trump.  

This special digs deep into what formed their unique personalities. their motivations and views of the world.
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This special will clear up a lot confusion that the main stream media has tried to analyze explained and failed,

Enjoy!

The Choice 2016 (full film) | FRONTLINE
September 27, 2016
NCM Blog
November 6, 2015
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Be the Media!
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Camille

Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump face off in Commander-in-Chief Forum Wed., Sept. 7th moderated by Matt Lauer

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Hello Everyone:

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off on live TV for the first time in their presidential campaigns tomorrow evening Wednesday, September 7th.  The hourlong forum will air live at 8 p.m. ET on MSNBC and be simulcast on NBC in most television markets

“Today” host Matt Lauer will moderate the first-ever“Commander-in-Chief Forum” at New York’s Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. 

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton on the 2016
presidential campaign trail
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Presidential General – Election Debate Schedule

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The first general-election debate will be held Sept. 26, 2016, at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio.   NBC’s Lester Holt
Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, will host the only Vice Presidential
debate on Oct. 4, 2016.    CBS News’ Elaine Quijano 
Washington University in St. Louis will host the second general-election debateon Oct. 9, 2016.   ABC’s Martha Raddatz and CNN’s Anderson Cooper

The final presidential debate will be hosted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, on Oct. 19, 2016.   Fox News’ Chris Wallace

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NBC’s Lester Holt, ABC’s Martha Raddatz, CNN’s Anderson Cooper 
and Fox News’ Chris Wallace to be moderators in the three presidential
debates, while CBS News’ Elaine Quijano will moderate the debate 
between vice presidential candidates.

TheYoungTurks 

Mon.-Fri. 6-8pm

TYT staff analysis during debates, forums, etc.  TYT takes no prisoners.  

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Cenk Uygur main host and co-founder of the social 
internet commentary program, 
NCM Blog
August 20, 2016
Be the Media!
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Camille
Camille Mitchell
Ambassador

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President Barack Obama Says, “This Is What a Feminist Looks Like”

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Hello Everyone:
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President Obama wrote and essay for that ran last week in Glamour (News and Politics). The essay is based on a speech the president gave two months ago at the White House Summit on the United State of Women.
There’s a lot that’s been done by and for women and girls, but there’s still plenty to do. Convened by the White House, the United State of Women Summit will rally all of us together to celebrate what we’ve achieved, and how we’re going to take action moving forward. Covering key gender equality issues, we’ll make a powerful difference in our collective future.  Click on video link below.

The Perk of a “45-Second Commute” The President has spent “a lot more time” watching Sasha and Malia grow into women. Meeting “Mac” the turkey November 2014
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Glamour.com

Barack Obama

August 4, 2016


There are a lot of tough aspects to being President. But there are some perks too. Meeting extraordinary people across the country. Holding an office where you get to make a difference in the life of our nation. Air Force One.

But perhaps the greatest unexpected gift of this job has been living above the store. For many years my life was consumed by long commutes­—from my home in Chicago to Springfield, Illinois, as a state senator, and then to Washington, D.C., as a United States senator. It’s often meant I had to work even harder to be the kind of husband and father I want to be.

But for the past seven and a half years, that commute has been reduced to 45 seconds—the time it takes to walk from my living room to the Oval Office. As a result, I’ve been able to spend a lot more time watching my daughters grow up into smart, funny, kind, wonderful young women.

That isn’t always easy, either—watching them prepare to leave the nest. But one thing that makes me optimistic for them is that this is an extraordinary time to be a woman. The progress we’ve made in the past 100 years, 50 years, and, yes, even the past eight years has made life significantly better for my daughters than it was for my grandmothers. And I say that not just as President but also as a feminist.

In my lifetime we’ve gone from a job market that basically confined women to a handful of often poorly paid positions to a moment when women not only make up roughly half the workforce but are leading in every sector, from sports to space, from Hollywood to the Supreme Court. I’ve witnessed how women have won the freedom to make your own choices about how you’ll live your lives—about your bodies, your educations, your careers, your finances. Gone are the days when you needed a husband to get a credit card. In fact, more women than ever, married or single, are financially independent.

So we shouldn’t downplay how far we’ve come. That would do a disservice to all those who spent their lives fighting for justice. At the same time, there’s still a lot of work we need to do to improve the prospects of women and girls here and around the world. And while I’ll keep working on good policies—from equal pay for equal work to protecting reproductive rights—there are some changes that have nothing to do with passing new laws.

In fact, the most important change may be the toughest of all—and that’s changing ourselves.

This is something I spoke about at length in June at the first-ever White House Summit on the United State of Women. As far as we’ve come, all too often we are still boxed in by stereotypes about how men and women should behave. One of my heroines is Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, who was the first African American to run for a major party’s presidential nomination. She once said, “The emotional, sexual, and psychological stereotyping of females begins when the doctor says, ‘It’s a girl.’ ” We know that these stereotypes affect how girls see themselves starting at a very young age, making them feel that if they don’t look or act a certain way, they are somehow less worthy. In fact, gender stereotypes affect all of us, regardless of our gender, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

Now, the most important people in my life have always been women. I was raised by a single mom, who spent much of her career working to empower women in developing countries. I watched as my grandmother, who helped raise me, worked her way up at a bank only to hit a glass ceiling. I’ve seen how Michelle has balanced the demands of a busy career and raising a family. Like many working mothers, she worried about the expectations and judgments of how she should handle the trade-offs, knowing that few people would question my choices. And the reality was that when our girls were young, I was often away from home serving in the state legislature, while also juggling my teaching responsibilities as a law professor. I can look back now and see that, while I helped out, it was usually on my schedule and on my terms. The burden disproportionately and unfairly fell on Michelle.

So I’d like to think that I’ve been pretty aware of the unique challenges women face—it’s what has shaped my own feminism. But I also have to admit that when you’re the father of two daughters, you become even more aware of how gender stereotypes pervade our society. You see the subtle and not-so-subtle social cues transmitted through culture. You feel the enormous pressure girls are under to look and behave and even think a certain way.

And those same stereotypes affected my own consciousness as a young man. Growing up without a dad, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out who I was, how the world perceived me, and what kind of man I wanted to be. It’s easy to absorb all kinds of messages from society about masculinity and come to believe that there’s a right way and a wrong way to be a man. But as I got older, I realized that my ideas about being a tough guy or cool guy just weren’t me. They were a manifestation of my youth and insecurity. Life became a lot easier when I simply started being myself.

So we need to break through these limitations. We need to keep changing the attitude that raises our girls to be demure and our boys to be assertive, that criticizes our daughters for speaking out and our sons for shedding a tear. We need to keep changing the attitude that punishes women for their sexuality and rewards men for theirs.

We need to keep changing the attitude that permits the routine harassment of women, whether they’re walking down the street or daring to go online. We need to keep changing the attitude that teaches men to feel threatened by the presence and success of women.

We need to keep changing the attitude that congratulates men for changing a diaper, stigmatizes full-time dads, and penalizes working mothers. We need to keep changing the attitude that values being confident, competitive, and ambitious in the workplace—unless you’re a woman. Then you’re being too bossy, and suddenly the very qualities you thought were necessary for success end up holding you back.

We need to keep changing a culture that shines a particularly unforgiving light on women and girls of color. Michelle has often spoken about this. Even after achieving success in her own right, she still held doubts; she had to worry about whether she looked the right way or was acting the right way—whether she was being too assertive or too “angry.”

As a parent, helping your kids to rise above these constraints is a constant learning process. Michelle and I have raised our daughters to speak up when they see a double standard or feel unfairly judged based on their gender or race—or when they notice that happening to someone else. It’s important for them to see role models out in the world who climb to the highest levels of whatever field they choose. And yes, it’s important that their dad is a feminist, because now that’s what they expect of all men.

Ladies First:  “Michelle and I have raised our daughters to speak up when they see a
double standard,” says the President.  With his family at the March 2016 Canadian
State Dinner for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Sophie Grégoire Trudeau
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It is absolutely men’s responsibility to fight sexism too. And as spouses and partners and boyfriends, we need to work hard and be deliberate about creating truly equal relationships.

The good news is that everywhere I go across the country, and around the world, I see people pushing back against dated assumptions about gender roles. From the young men who’ve joined our It’s On Us campaign to end campus sexual assault, to the young women who became the first female Army Rangers in our nation’s history, your generation refuses to be bound by old ways of thinking. And you’re helping all of us understand that forcing people to adhere to outmoded, rigid notions of identity isn’t good for anybody—men, women, gay, straight, transgender, or otherwise. These stereotypes limit our ability to simply be ourselves.

This fall we enter a historic election. Two hundred and forty years after our nation’s founding, and almost a century after women finally won the right to vote, for the first time ever, a woman is a major political party’s presidential nominee. No matter your political views, this is a historic moment for America. And it’s just one more example of how far women have come on the long journey toward equality.

I want all of our daughters and sons to see that this too is their inheritance. I want them to know that it’s never been just about the Benjamins; it’s about the Tubmans too. And I want them to help do their part to ensure that America is a place where every single child can make of her life what she will.

That’s what twenty-first-century feminism is about: the idea that when everybody is equal, we are all more free.

Barack Obama is the 44th president of the United States.

The following 2 minute video is from a montage of a larger performance by Ms. Keys at the DNC that conveys the essay and video above by President Obama,
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Alicia Keys sings “Girl on Fire”
(This song ends with a surprise)
Bonjour!
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Camille
Camille Mitchell
Ambassador

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