Delicacies and Decadence: The Chinese State Dinner – September 25, 2015 – 20 photos

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大家好!
(Hello Everyone!)


President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama will host the President of the People’s Republic of China, Xi Jinping, and Madame Peng Liyuan for an Official State Visit followed by a State Dinner. 
This marks the tenth State Visit of the Obama Administration; previous visits include: India in November 2009, Mexico in May 2010, China in January 2011, Germany in June 2011, Korea in October 2011, the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland in March 2012, France in February 2014, Japan in April 2015, and the Holy See in September 2015. 

This visit reciprocates President Obama’s State Visit to China in November 2014.  President Xi’s visit presents an opportunity to expand U.S.-China cooperation on a range of global, regional, and bilateral issues of mutual interest, while also enabling President Obama and President Xi to constructively address areas of disagreement. 

The photo gallery found at the link directly below has more photos including a few of my favorites listed in the paragraph below

Director, producer, writer, actor of Lee Daniels arriving with his mother Clara Daniels.  Leedirected the film The Butler and the critically acclaimed TV series Empire. The State Dinner featured a performance by singer, composer, actor, producer NE-YO seen arriving with his mother Harriett Loraine Burts in the photo below.
Facebook founder/CEO Mark Zuckerberg with his wife Dr. Priscilla Chan.  They are expecting their first child.

First Lady Michelle Obama “First glance at China State Dinner.”

Chinese First Lady Peng Liyuan, First Lady Michelle Obama 
Chinese President Xi Jinping and President Barack Obama
pose for a formal photo_Sept. 25, 2015
Entertainment
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Upon entering the dinner, guests were entertained by the Sphinx Organization String Quartet from Detroit, Michigan. The Sphinx Organization is a non-profit organization dedicated to the development of young Black and Latino classical musicians.

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The Sphinx Organization
“Building Diversity in Classical Music”
The White House hosted a State Dinner Performance after dinner featuring selections by NE-YO is of African-American & Chinese descent and a three time Grammy Award-winner singer, composer, producer, actor, and founder of a non-profit organization aimed to lift up and support children in foster care. 

Ne-Yo arrives with his mother Harriett Loraine Burts
有美妙的一天!
(Have a Fantastic Day!)
Camille
Camille Mitchell
Ambassador
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Maria Shriver on Pope Francis’ historic trip and his impact

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A Special Sunday!

Maria Shriver, journalist, activist, best selling author and former first lady of California has an excellent weekly newsletter that has inspirational stories regarding people and ways to foster change and empower people and communities.
Ms. Shriver’s message this week is about Pope Francis and his historic trip to the United States.  Maria sums up what Pope Francis visit meant to her below.  Also, you will be inspired by Maria’s mission and the subjects she usually explores and covers.  Many of Maria’s Emmy Award winning stories relate to her passionate interests regarding Alzheimer’s disease, children and adults with intellectual disabilities and women with children living in poverty.
Bonjour!
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Camille

 

mariashriver.com

mariasmessage 2

I don’t really know where to start.

Pope Francis has had a dramatic impact on my life this past week. It’s almost hard to put into words.

I got into journalism long ago because I wanted to tell stories that inspired people. Stories that moved people. I’ve covered a lot of big events in my career, interviewed a lot of people, but covering Pope Francis’ visit to America has got to be the highlight.

No, I didn’t get to interview him. I didn’t even get to meet him, but it didn’t actually matter because his words met my heart and ignited my spirit. I felt them deep in my soul.

Every sermon, every speech moved me further, moved me deeper. Some I’ve read and reread 10 times. His presence and his words at the 9/11 memorial brought me to tears.

The NBC studio in which I sat was silent. Everyone was transfixed as he spoke about pain, the power of love and remembrance. I listened to the prayer of St. Francis and the Beatitudes. I watched as leaders of so many different faiths stood up beside him and spoke their truths. And I reflected about how I was living my own life and I thought about all the people in it and I thought about their lives.

When the Pope spoke to the Congress about the Golden Rule I thought about that message and how I was living it. When he urged us to all go out and be of service like Mary had been, I took an internal inventory. In fact, this whole week made me take a internal inventory of everything in my life.

It made me reassess power, success, joy, money. I thought about the culture of care and the culture of waste. I thought deeply about those on the margins that this Pope urges us to reach out to.

He pushes us to open our eyes and our hearts to our neighbors that live so close, yet also so far away. He urged us to enable real men and real women to escape from extreme poverty. He said we must allow them to be dignified agents of their own destiny.

“Dignified agents of ones destiny.”

I love that. Each of us have the ability to be dignified agents of our own destiny.

The Pope pushed us to realize that we are all sharing a common home. One that we must care for, respect, love, and honor.

He said all of this and more, so much more. I feel in love with this man. With the way he spoke, with the wisdom he shared, with the gentle — but strong and clear — way he asked each of us for more.

I believe deeply that the world is yearning to be good, to be better and do better than we currently are. I believe in the goodness of people. I believe in their kindness. I saw it everywhere I went this week following this Pope. I believe everyone felt he was speaking to them and so they felt validated, felt, seen. Everyone felt understood. It was healing.

We all share a common desire to be understood, to be loved, to be accepted, to be treated like we matter. You don’t have to meet a great leader to be transformed by them. A great leader ignites your heart. A great leader makes you want to be a better person. A great leader reaches out, listens, feels your pain and works to make it bearable.

“Pray for me,” Pope Francis said to people he met along his way and then he said “To those who don’t believe, I hope you wish me well.”

I hope that we all dig down and find the strength to wish each other well. It’s so simple. It’s so profound. It’s so Pope Francis.

In Philadelphia, Pope Francis told the story of Pennsylvania native Saint Katharine Drexel going to Pope Leo XIII, telling him the challenges of her community and the Pope said to her: “What about you? What are you going to do?” The question made her think about her own contribution to the church and changed her life.

“What about you?” resonates with me as I look onward. What about you? What can we all do to foster what the Pope has been saying. What can we do to make our communities better, kinder, more compassionate and caring? What can we each do to foster our common home?

I hope that we don’t go back to talking to each other in belittling ways. I hope we make this visit matter. I hope we let it transform us for the better. I don’t want to go back to the way it was before Pope Francis came to America. I know I can’t go back. I know I’m going forward differently because of him.

I pray for this man. I wish him well and I thank him. Thank him for leading with humility, with simplicity, with empathy, with love.

I’ll be praying for him and praying for you. Please also pray for me. Amen. #PassItForward.

 

With love, 

maria-sig-104x59

*ShriverMedia.com Launches New Website

Shriver Media, the producer of The Shriver Report Snapshots, MariaShriver.com, Shriver Films, Maria Shriver’s conversation series and more launched their brand new site — check out what we’re working on and tell us what you think. (via Shriver Media)

GM CEO Mary Barra No. 1 on Fortune Most Powerful Women List – & one of my favorite Heroines

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It’s a Good Sunday!
One of businesses shining stars is Mary Barra, CEO of GM,  Ms. Barra has done the nearly impossible in a mere 18 months since becoming CEO on January 15, 2014.  See the story at the link directly below. But, what I admire most is her integrity, character and grace as she navigated through shark infested waters of lawsuits,  congressional hearings and corporate inertia. 
“I… believe if you have a problem you better solve it.
Because if you don’t solve it, you won’t be here or the company won’t be here.” 
~Mary Barra 
January 29, 2014; two weeks after becoming CEO of GM 

GM CEO Barra No. 1 on Fortune Most Powerful Women list
Melissa Burden
The Detroit News
Sept. 10, 2015

General Motors Co. CEO Mary Barra has been crowned tops in a new Fortune magazine list of the Most Powerful Women.

The Detroit automaker’s top executive since early 2014, Barra, 53, was cited by Fortune for leading the carmaker “out from under the shadow of its 2014 ignition-switch recall.”

The ignition-switch recall tied to 124 deaths has cost GM billions of dollars and it faces multiple lawsuits and investigations by the Department of Justice, Securities and Exchange Commission, 50 state attorneys general and Transport Canada.  [The criminal lawsuit was settled on September 17, 2015 in lieu of a $900 million dollar fine.  See article above]

“In recent months she has beaten back headwinds from weak international markets, as sales of expensive trucks and SUVs have soared,” Fortune said. “Barra was one of the few female CEO participants in the viral #ilooklikeanengineer Twitter campaign, which promoted women in tech.”

Barra ranked No. 2 on the same list a year ago. In this year’s list, she beat out women such as Indra Nooyi, chairperson and CEO of PepsiCo and Ginni Rometty, CEO chairperson and president of IBM.

​Released June 2015
Mary Barra quote

Bonjour!
Camille
Camille Mitchell
Ambassador

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Vanessa Williams Returns to Miss America and Receives an Apology

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Happy Monday Everyone!
A new Miss America was crowned on Sunday; but, an apology to Vanessa Williams stole the show
The New York Times article below includes a brief video clip performing of her songs last night with an apology from Sam Haskell, executive chairman of Miss America pageant. 
Note:  Mr. Haskell was not with Miss America in 1984; however, when I heard Mr. Haskell apology to Vanessa; I said, “Here is someone who has integrity and character”.  I did some research and sure enough his reputation is impeccable.
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Sam Haskell, former Executive Vice President and Worldwide Head of Television for the venerable William Morris Agency, who, at age 52, was named in 2007 by TV Week as one of the 25 Most Innovative and Influential People in Television over the last quarter century.
Sam authored the autobiographical memoir with life lessons, “Promises I Made My Mother” published in 2009 and is a national bestseller.  It’s an incisive, compelling, deeply personal and spiritually-enriching story about living a principled life in unprincipled times
Mr. Haskell, widely recognized for rising to the top of a turbulent and often times conscienceless business with his character, integrity and value-system intact.  
Helen Williams (Vanessa’s mother–see her reaction in video clip)  was clearly overjoyed by the apology made to her daughter and Vanessa was surprised by the unexpected apology.   
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Sam Haskell, executive chairman of the Miss America
 pageant apologizes to Vanessa Williams
NCM Blog
September 9, 2015

​Sam Haskell, Exec, Chairman, Miss America 2016 Betty Cantrell 
(Georgia), Vanessa Williams & talent producer Brian Edwards

Bonjour!​​
Camille

Stephen Burrows is the “brightest star of American fashion” NY Times during Battle of Versailles period – Part 3 of 3

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Fashionistas Hello!

Stephen Burrows: When Fashion Danced looks at the period spanning the 1970s when Stephen Burrows’s meteoric rise to fame made him not only the first African-American designer to gain international stature, but a celebrated fashion innovator whose work helped define the look of a generation.
Three Videos
Enjoy the two short videos directly below from the “When Fashion Danced” exhibition.  The2012 Spring/Summer fashion show video link is above the model wearing the red and black stripe top with red skirt.


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Illustration by Stephen Burrows, 1989
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Fashion designer Stephen Burrows was born on September 15, 1943 in Newark, New Jersey to Gerald Burrows and Octavia Pennington. At a very young age, Burrows started sewing and making clothes under the guidance of his grandmother, Beatrice Simmons. He went on to attend elementary school in Newark, New Jersey, and graduated from Arts High School in 1960. Burrows then attended the Philadelphia Museum College of Art from 1961 to 1962, and later graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City in 1966.

Upon graduation, Burrows was hired as a fashion designer for Weber Originals, but decided to work freelance in 1967. In 1968, he co-founded O Boutique in New York City. The following year, Burrows launched a ready-to-wear collection for the upscale department store Bonwit Teller with his friend Roz Rubenstein. In 1969, Burrows was introduced to Geraldine Stutz, president of the Henri Bendel department store, and was hired and offered his own boutique called Stephen Burrows World. The success of Stephen Burrows World was immediate, and allowed Burrows to cater to celebrity clientele such as Diana Ross, Cher and Barbra Streisand. In 1973, he left Bendel’s, founded Burrows, Inc., and began working on New York’s Seventh Avenue. That same year, Burrows was one of five American designers invited to show his clothes on the runway of Versailles, France, where he received rave reviews. He became the first African American designer to gain international fame.

In 1977, Burrows returned to Henri Bendel and joined Pat Tennant, Inc., but left again in 1982. In 1993, he became affiliated once more with Bendel’s, and in 2002, reopened Stephen Burrows World. In 2010, Burrows designed a collection for Target retail stores and opened a showroom and design studio in New York City’s garment center. In 2013, he became designer and president of Stephen Burrows, LTD.

Burrows has been honored with three Coty American Fashion Critics’ Awards, the highest praise that can be awarded in fashion. In 1975, he received the Council of American Fashion Critics Award and the Knitted Association Crystal Ball Award. He was named to the Fashion Walk of Fame in 2003 and received the Council of Fashion Designers of America’s Board of Directors Special Tribute Award in 2006. In 2014, Burrows was honored with lifetime achievement awards from the Savannah College of Art and Design and the Pratt Institute of Design.

Stephen Burrows was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on July 14, 2014.


Stephen poses with model wearing his design  
Essence Magazine 2011
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“I consider Burrows the only original American designer since Claire McCardell.  Why? Because he created his own rules about cut.  It was sophisticated, original, unorthodox.”   ~Karl Lagerfeld, fashion’s most opinionated man.
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Stephen Burrows Spring/Summer 2012 collection
Iconic women 
In 1978 Farrah Fawcett wore his gold chainmail dress to the Academy Awards where she was a presenter. Fashion critics have said the dress is one of the most classic “Oscar” dresses of all time
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First Lady Michelle Obama wore a Burrows Jersey pantsuit to a Washington DC event in 2010.  Remarking on the significance, Vogue Magazine wrote, “It was a wonderful acknowledgement of Burrows, one of the great African-American designers and a Harlem resident known for his inventive cuts and bias technique.”

Stunning Farrah Fawcett in Stephen’s gold
chainmail gown_1978

Bonjour!

Camille
Camille Mitchell

Pat Cleveland’s catwalk defined her as a supermodel – The Battle of Versailles ’73 continues

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Good Afternoon Fashionistas:

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If there is an embodiment of the catwalk theatrics synonymous with the late sixties and seventies, it is defined by one of the industry’s first supermodels, Pat Cleveland.With a walk that was something like Broadway-meets-flamenco, Cleveland proved that models weren’t just good in pictures, they could move, too. The two videos below will leave you more energized or exhausted.  Needless to say this legendary supermodel had plenty of energy to spare. 

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​Pat Cleveland wearing Stephen Burrows
at the Battle of Versailles 1973
​Pat Cleveland wearing Halston
circa 1970’s
Model Pat Cleveland was born in New York City on June 23, 1950. Her father, Johnny Johnston, was a saxophonist; her mother, Lady Bird Cleveland, a painter. After her parents separated, Cleveland was raised by her mother in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. She graduated from New York’s High School of Art and Design in 1969.
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Cleveland’s career as a fashion model began in 1966 when she was spotted on a New York subway by Carrie Donovan, an assistant editor at Vogue magazine. She first modeled as a live mannequin in Ebony’s Fashion Fair, and then for Vogue magazine. In 1970, Cleveland relocated to Paris, France, where she worked with illustrator Antonio Lopez and became a house model for Karl Lagerfeld’s Chloé. She modeled for designers such as Valentino, Oscar de la Renta, Yves Saint Laurent, Thierry Mugler and Christian Dior. In 1973, Cleveland was part of the benefit fashion show at the Palace of Versailles in France.

Cleveland returned to the United States in 1974, and continued modeling into the 1980s. She also established a modeling agency in Milan, Italy, andpublished a volume of poetry in 2001 entitled In The Spirit Of Grace. In 2003, Cleveland returned to the fashion runway, walking for designers Bill Blass andStephen Burrows, and at Chanel, with her daughter, Anna van Ravenstein.(see photo below)  Cleveland also modeled with her daughter for designer Zac Posen in 2013.

Cleveland has appeared in countless fashion spreads and on the covers of such magazines as Vanity FairEssenceVogue,Women’s Wear DailyL’Officiel, and GQ. In addition, she appeared in advertisement campaigns for Vidal Sasoon and Karl Lagerfeld, and has been photographed by Steven Meisel and Andy Warhol. In 2010, Cleveland appeared as a guest judge in season fourteen of America’s Next Top Model. That same year, she appeared in the documentary Ultrasuede, In Search of Halston. In 2012, Cleveland was featured in two more fashion documentaries, Versailles ’73: American Runway Revolution and About Face: Supermodels Then and Now.

Cleveland is married to Paul van Ravenstein. They have two children: Noel andAnna.

Pat Cleveland was interviewed by The HistoryMakers on August 14, 2014.

The Bold and the Beautiful photo shoot
Left: Pat Cleveland, Alva Chinn, Bethann Hardison, 
Jaunel McKenzie, Kinee Diouf & Shelby Coleman
The Battle of Versailles ’73 book launch 2015
There were many more models participating in the The Battle of Versailles. Fashion editor Robin Givhan’s book unfolds all the high drama that arose in implementing this historic event.
​Pat with daughter Anna in for Lanvin
Summer 2015
NCM Blog
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September 9, 2015
e
​Book synopsis on September 9, 2015 blog post above.
The fashion designer that broke the mode in part 3 of 3 The Battle of Versailles.
Bonjour!
– 
Camille

If you miss The Devil Wears Prada–then The Battle of Versailles: is a Fashionista’s high drama

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Hello Fashionistas:
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When a group of top African American models [10 out of 36] boarded a plane to Paris in 1973, they had no idea they would pull off fashion’s biggest coup. Pitting the crème de la crème of French couture fashion against upstart American designers, the 1973 Grand Divertissement at Versailles was not only the first time French and American designers battled it out on the runway, but smashed the glass ceiling irrevocably for ethnic models in high fashion across the globe.
​A still of Stephen Burrows runway presentation Versailles ’73 
Photo credit: arts.nationalpost.com
Stephen Burrows, fashion designer selected eight
 African American models to represent America for 
The Battle of Versailles_1973
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​Stephen & model Jennifer Brice_1973
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Released March 2015
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“It was a big deal when American fashion went to Versailles. Who better than Robin Givhan to tell this captivating story?” – Diane von Furstenberg

On November 28, 1973, the world’s social elite gathered at the Palace of Versailles for an international fashion show. By the time the curtain came down on the evening’s spectacle, history had been made and the industry had been forever transformed. This is that story.

Conceived as a fund-raiser for the restoration of King Louis XIV’s palace, in the late fall of 1973, five top American designers faced off against five top French designers in an over-the-top runway extravaganza. An audience filled with celebrities and international jet-setters, including Princess Grace of Monaco, the Duchess of Windsor, Paloma Picasso, and Andy Warhol, were treated to an opulent performance featuring Liza Minnelli, Josephine Baker, and Rudolph Nureyev. What they saw would forever alter the history of fashion.

The Americans at the Battle of Versailles – Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass, Anne Klein, Halston, andStephen Burrows showed their work against the five French designers considered the best in the world –Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy, Pierre Cardin, Emanuel Ungaro, and Marc Bohan of Christian Dior. Plagued by in-fighting, outsized egos, shoestring budgets, and innumerable technical difficulties, the American contingent had little chance of meeting the European’s exquisite and refined standards. But against all odds, the American energy and the domination by the fearless models (ten of whom, in a groundbreaking move, were African American) sent the audience reeling. By the end of the evening, the Americans had officially taken their place on the world’s stage, prompting a major shift in the way race, gender, sexuality, and economics would be treated in fashion for decades to come. As the curtain came down on The Battle of Versailles, American fashion was born; no longer would the world look to Europe to determine the stylistic trends of the day, from here forward, American sensibility and taste would command the world’s attention.

Pulitzer-Prize winning fashion journalist Robin Givhan offers a lively and meticulously well-researched account of this unique event. The Battle of Versailles is a sharp, engaging cultural history; this intimate examination of a single moment shows us how the world of fashion as we know it came to be.

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Robin Givhan

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Robin Givhan is the fashion editor for The Washington Post.  She won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for criticism, the first such time for a fashion writer. The Pulitzer Committee explained its rationale by noting Givhan’s “witty, closely observed essays that transform fashion criticism into cultural criticism.”
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The native of Detroit, Michigan; she graduated from Princeton University  and in  1986, she earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. After working for the Detroit Free Press for about seven years, she held positions at the San Francisco Chronicle and Vogue magazine.

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 This high drama continues this week with models that broke the mode.
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Bonjour!
– 
 Camille 
Camille Mitchell
Ambassador

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